The World is Recognizing That it Doesn’t Need Erdogan — And the Lira is Beginning to Reflect it

The battle for facts, social media manipulation, a new genocide, and certain inflation.

Image for post
Image for post

Enes Kanter, an NBA star, calls him “Turkish Hitler”.

That is because, over a hundred years ago, 1.5 million Armenians were systematically eradicated from this world. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Turkey’s current president, doesn’t agree with the facts of history. When 308 references on Wikipedia alone can’t liberate the information processing in Erdogan’s mind, it’s safe to say that the truth is an irrelevant part of his governing agenda.

Time magazine printed an entire piece documenting Erdogan’s fascination and nostalgia for the Ottoman Empire back in September of this year. Their conclusion was succinctly placed in the title: Why Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s Love Affair with the Ottoman Empire Should Worry The World.

Just four years ago, Erdogan was pushing to increase his executive powers within the country, citing Hitler’s Germany, the Third Reich, as his primary example of an effective government.

“Zero problems with neighbors”

At least, that was Turkey’s foreign policy claim just 10 years ago. Erdogan’s Turkey has rendered that claim absurd.

Today, Turkey is involved in a conflict in Libya, in Syria, and has repeatedly attempted to silence and murder its very own Kurdish population by proxy of the PKK, or Kurdistan Workers’ Party. That battle continues into Turkey’s struggle in Iraq. The Mediterranean is becoming a military hotspot, concentrating on issues surrounding drilling rights for natural-gas deposits; all of which is a territorial push on the outskirts of Greece and Cyprus.

Turkey’s latest mission has been the ethnic cleansing in Artsakh, or Nagorno-Karabakh, a land between Armenia and Azerbaijan that has been contested since Joseph Stalin illegally gifted it to Azerbaijan in an attempt to placate Turkey almost a hundred years ago.

On October 11th, only two weeks after Azerbaijan’s aggression — aided by Turkey’s military resourcesbegan to aim at the capital and civilians, Los Angeles saw nearly 200,000 Armenian Diasporans marching for international intervention and peace.

Image for post
Image for post

Of course, Azerbaijan denies that they struck first. According to their intelligence, Armenia attacked first. A country with a third of Azerbaijan’s population, a third of their geographic size, and a fifth of their defense budget. Azerbaijan, and, by extension, Turkey, has maintained a policy of closing the country to foreign journalists and severely restricting any and all social media freedoms to their own people.

Following the money, or, in Turkey’s case, the lira.

Currencies are a weird thing. Paper printed within one’s borders by the people in charge of the paper printing is worth something to others who want it. Follow that up with the paper in other countries and you now have something called an exchange.

Image for post
Image for post

Over the last five years, the lira has seen its currency weaken significantly on the global exchange. Inflation in the country is already estimated to exceed an annual rate of 12 percent, given that the government has been forcing banks to lend at an increasing rate. With each crisis that Turkey forces its way into, the world stage realizes with more certainty that they don’t have demand for any lira assets.

A former central banker who writes columns on the Turkish economy said that “This is a train wreck in slow motion”.

Businesses with debt within Turkey who hold that debt in U.S. dollars signal the largest red flags in the midst of the pandemic. With economic sanctions threatening Turkey’s ability to export anything of substance, the economy is likely to continue spiraling adjacent to the global stage.

What happens next?

An economy is violently weakening as a direct result of Erdogan’s terroristic tendencies and human rights violations.

Erdogan’s Turkey is a pipedream embedded in him being reborn as the next Sultan. His idolization of fascists, dictators, and authoritarian regimes are not just dangerous but an outright threat to the livelihood of all civilizations everywhere.

It isn’t just his denial of the first genocides the Ottoman Empire committed against the Armenians, Assyrians, and the Greeks in the midst of the First World War. There is a pattern in the rule of that region to lash outward in the name of hyper-nationalism. In the run-up to the Crimean War, John Russell deemed the Ottoman Empire as the Sick Man of Europe”. It was the world’s preoccupation with the First World War that the Ottoman Empire used as leverage to systematically kill over 1.5 million Armenians. The idea of human rights has never entered the realm of possibility within the government; at least, never when it is seen as a direct threat to their geopolitical power.

It was those events that encouraged a young Adolf Hitler, as he said in his Obersalzberg Speech:

“Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?”

The last time the world attempted the appeasement route, over 6 million people were systematically killed at the hands of a monster.

Written by

UC Berkeley, mathematics. Los Angeles. Long-time runner. Top writer on Quora, 100M+ total content views. New to Medium. Inquiries: Moumj@berkeley.edu

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store